Posts Tagged ‘King of Kings’

In today’s passage from Matthew 21, we read about Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem, which was a fulfillment of prophecy.

‘Behold, your king is coming to you,
humble, and mounted on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden.’”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had directed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and put on them their cloaks, and he sat on them. Most of the crowd spread their cloaks on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. And the crowds that went before him and that followed him were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!”

In a message, “Jesus Declares His Kingship,” John Piper says Jesus declares himself King of the Jews and King of the nations in four ways:

  1. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Riding on a Donkey (Zech. 9:9)
  2. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Cleansing the Temple (Isa. 56:7)
  3. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Healing (Isa. 35:4-6)
  4. Jesus Declares His Kingship by His Response to Children (Psalm 8)

Jesus came the first time, and he is coming again, as the king over all kings. King of Israel, king of all the nations, king of nature and the universe. Until he comes again, there is a day of amnesty and forgiveness and patience. He still rides a donkey and not yet a white war-horse with a rod of iron. He is ready to save all who receive him as Savior and Treasure and King. Come to him. Know him. Receive him. Live your life in allegiance to him.

To read the rest of the message, click here:

At this time of year, we celebrate the birth of our Savior and sing of the “newborn King”  and J. C. Ryle, as quoted at Grace Gems, connects Jesus’ kingly birth with his kingly death:

how our Lord was crucified as a KING. The title placed over our Lord’s head made this plain and unmistakable. The reader of Greek, or Latin, or Hebrew, could not fail to see that He who hung on the central cross of the three on Golgotha, had a royal title over His head. The overruling hand of God so ordered matters, that the strong will of Pilate overrode for once the wishes of the malicious Jews. In spite of the chief priests, our Lord was crucified as “the King of the Jews.”

It was fit and right that so it should be. Even before our Lord was born, the angel Gabriel declared to the Virgin Mary, “The Lord God shall give unto Him the throne of His father David–and He shall reign over the house of Jacob forever; and of His kingdom there shall be no end.” (Luke 1:32, 33.) Almost as soon as He was born, there came wise men from the East, saying, “Where is He that is born King of the Jews?” (Matt. 2:2.) The very week before the crucifixion, the multitude who accompanied our Lord at His triumphal entry into Jerusalem, had cried, “Blessed is the King of Israel who comes in the name of the Lord.” (John 12:13.) The current belief of all godly Jews was, that when Messiah, the Son of David came, He would come as a King. A kingdom of heaven and a kingdom of God was continually proclaimed by our Lord throughout His ministry. A King indeed He was, as He told Pilate, of a kingdom utterly unlike the kingdoms of this world, but for all that a true King of a true kingdom, and a Ruler of true subjects. As such He was born. As such He lived. As such He was crucified. And as such He will come again, and reign over the whole earth, King of kings and Lord of lords.

Clap your hands, all peoples!
Shout to God with loud songs of joy!
For the Lord, the Most High, is to be feared,
a great king over all the earth. Psalm 47:1-2

C. H. Spurgeon in “The Treasury of David:”

Our God is no local deity, no petty ruler of a tribe; in infinite majesty he rules the mightiest realm as absolute arbiter of destiny, sole monarch of all lands, King of kings, and Lord of lords. Not a hamlet or an islet is excluded from his dominion. How glorious will that era be when this is seen and known of all; when in the person of Jesus all flesh shall behold the glory of the Lord!

To read the rest of Spurgeon’s commentary on Psalm 47, click here:

From the ESV Study Bible:

checkmate2 Chron. 18:28–34 Ahab is enticed into battle, as the spirit had promised (v. 20). His decision to disguise himself, while rather cynically directing Jehoshaphat to wear his royal robes, indicates his dominant role in the alliance and perhaps also represents a contrived attempt to evade Micaiah’s word of doom. But events turn out the opposite of what Ahab intended: Jehoshaphat is delivered in battle as a consequence of his desperate prayer (v. 31band the Lord helped him; God drew them away from him is the Chronicler’s own addition to the text; see note on vv. 1–2), while Ahab dies from an apparently random arrow (v. 33), clear evidence of God’s sovereign direction of events.

Clap your hands, all peoples!
Shout to God with loud songs of joy!
For the Lord, the Most High, is to be feared,
a great king over all the earth. Psalm 47:1-2

C. H. Spurgeon in “The Treasury of David:”

Our God is no local deity, no petty ruler of a tribe; in infinite majesty he rules the mightiest realm as absolute arbiter of destiny, sole monarch of all lands, King of kings, and Lord of lords. Not a hamlet or an islet is excluded from his dominion. How glorious will that era be when this is seen and known of all; when in the person of Jesus all flesh shall behold the glory of the Lord!

To read the rest of Spurgeon’s commentary on Psalm 47, click here:

In today’s passage from Matthew 21, we read about Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem, which was a fulfillment of prophecy.

‘Behold, your king is coming to you,
humble, and mounted on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden.’”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had directed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and put on them their cloaks, and he sat on them. Most of the crowd spread their cloaks on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. And the crowds that went before him and that followed him were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!”

In a message, “Jesus Declares His Kingship,” John Piper says Jesus declares himself King of the Jews and King of the nations in four ways:

  1. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Riding on a Donkey (Zech. 9:9)
  2. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Cleansing the Temple (Isa. 56:7)
  3. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Healing (Isa. 35:4-6)
  4. Jesus Declares His Kingship by His Response to Children (Psalm 8)

Jesus came the first time, and he is coming again, as the king over all kings. King of Israel, king of all the nations, king of nature and the universe. Until he comes again, there is a day of amnesty and forgiveness and patience. He still rides a donkey and not yet a white war-horse with a rod of iron. He is ready to save all who receive him as Savior and Treasure and King. Come to him. Know him. Receive him. Live your life in allegiance to him.

To read the rest of the message, click here:

 

C. H Spurgeon, comments on Psalm 24 in The Treasury of David:

The watchers at the gate hearing the song look over the battlements and ask, “Who is this King of glory?” A question full of meaning and worthy of the meditations of eternity. Who is he in person, nature, character, office and work? What is his pedigree? What his rank and what his race? The answer given in a mighty wave of music is, The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle.” We know the might of Jesus by the battles which he has fought, the victories which he has won over sin, and death, and hell, and we clap our hands as we see him leading captivity captive in the majesty of his strength. Oh for a heart to sing his praises! Mighty hero, be thou crowned for ever King of kings and Lord of lords.

Psalm 144:1 Blessed be the Lord, my rock,
who trains my hands for war,
and my fingers for battle;
he is my steadfast love and my fortress,
my stronghold and my deliverer,
my shield and he in whom I take refuge,
who subdues peoples under me……

I will sing a new song to you, O God;
upon a ten-stringed harp I will play to you,
10 who gives victory to kings,
who rescues David his servant from the cruel sword.

Spurgeon comments in “The Treasury of David”:

 Those whom the Lord sets up he will keep up. Kings, from their conspicuous position, are exposed to special danger, and when their lives and their thrones are preserved to them they should give the Lord the glory of it. In his many battles David would have perished had not almighty care preserved him. He had by his valour wrought salvation for Israel, but he lays his laurels at the feet of his Lord and Preserver. If any men need salvation kings do, and if they get it the fact is so astonishing that it deserves a verse to itself in the psalm of praise.

This goes along beautifully with the passage from 2 Chronicles 16 that we read today, and the post, “Checkmate!” from today. 

C. H. Spurgeon in “The Treasury of David:”

Our God is no local deity, no petty ruler of a tribe; in infinite majesty he rules the mightiest realm as absolute arbiter of destiny, sole monarch of all lands, King of kings, and Lord of lords. Not a hamlet or an islet is excluded from his dominion. How glorious will that era be when this is seen and known of all; when in the person of Jesus all flesh shall behold the glory of the Lord!

To read the rest of Spurgeon’s commentary on Psalm 47, click here:

 

In a message, “Jesus Declares His Kingship,” John Piper says Jesus declares himself King of the Jews and King of the nations in four ways:

  1. hosanna_l1Jesus Declares His Kingship by Riding on a Donkey (Zech. 9:9)
  2. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Cleansing the Temple (Isa. 56:7)
  3. Jesus Declares His Kingship by Healing (Isa. 35:4-6)
  4. Jesus Declares His Kingship by His Response to Children (Psalm 8)

Jesus came the first time, and he is coming again, as the king over all kings. King of Israel, king of all the nations, king of nature and the universe. Until he comes again, there is a day of amnesty and forgiveness and patience. He still rides a donkey and not yet a white war-horse with a rod of iron. He is ready to save all who receive him as Savior and Treasure and King. Come to him. Know him. Receive him. Live your life in allegiance to him.

To read the rest of the message, click here: